The Importance of Water – Our Natural Resource

Water is so important in our lives and vital part of it, and where water is scarce, some people in the world do not have clean drinking water, who do not have access to showers on a daily basis, in other places water is limited and come from wells, and replenished by trucks.

When I was in California when we were driving through Visalia, Tulare, Bakersfield, Fresno, on Highway 99 and inland of California plus other places, I saw big signs saying “No, Water, No Jobs”, and the crops, vegetables, trees, grass, fruits that are shipped across North America are crying for water and are crying for rain. I can see how dry the land is, grass and some trees have turned blonde/yellow and desperately need rain to liven up the soil and crops. By the time the produce makes it to us, the flavour and freshness changes a lot. There is a lot of farm land in California and passed by hundreds and thousands probably.

We are very lucky to have our water resources, where other places are in desperate need. In areas of California they are so strict about watering lawns, taking long showers, continuously keeping the water on while washing dishes, washing cars, and driveways. I heard they authorities are fining people if caught. I have always heard the severity and the shortage in California, but actually witnessing it in person is absolutely terrible.

Keep showers short, turn off the water when brushing your teeth, Do not keep the water running in the sink when using the washroom (people do that and I have seen it in public restrooms), and do not use it to water your lawn much. If you know it rains in your areas, Let mother nature take its course.  Inform your family and friends and always remind them to use water wisely.

Use water responsibly and do not waste it. It is a very precious resource of our world. Water is life.

4 thoughts on “The Importance of Water – Our Natural Resource

  1. Striving Writer says:

    In the Philippines, we are currently experiencing El Niño. The long drought has dried up the dams, farms, and fishponds. In some cities, residents are facing water shortage, having access to water only for 3 to 4 hours and at dawn too. The situation has caused me paranoia. I get alarmed if we lost water connection, but I did store a lot of water, though. But what can I do if people steal water from my containers? I currently reside in a boarding house, and people there waste water and they take water from my containers when I’m not around. Water access is very important from me, since I come from a village where access to potable water used to be inaccessible.

    Right now, we have low pressure to no water in the evenings, so right after I arrive from work, I act as fast as I could: Take my half bath, waste clothes, perform my necessities, etc. I can even change my sleeping pattern if I want to waste clothes early in the morning. I pray a lot today for rain and deliverance from the long drought.

    I think we ought to learn from the Israelis and the Aussies. The Israeli authorities made the people believe they have less amounts of water – in order to encourage people to conserve it. The fact is, they did have lots of water, thanks to their desalination plants. They always fix leaks and recycle waste water and rainwater. The Aussies, on the other hand, limit their water consumption to 55 gallon per person per day.

  2. Striving Writer says:

    Reblogged this on Writing Under The Shades of Blue and commented:
    I hope people in the Philippines can finally understand the real value of water and the great importance of water conservation. Without water, Philippines is no paradise – and will never be a paradise unless it learns how to conserve water. We can boast about the beauty and wonder of Boracay, Mayon Volcano, Tagaytay, Baguio, Palawan, white sand beaches, Chocolate Hills, etc – but these wonders are nothing if people in the rest of the country have no water for days.

    I pray the Philippine government will pay attention to its water problem. It’s high time they invest in desalination plants and rainwater catchment systems, regulate water use by hotels, resorts, restaurants, and car wash facilities, urge farmers to practice efficient irrigation, and indoctrinate the public about proper water use.

    It’s time the Philippines not pay to its empty boasts of having beautiful tourist destinations. It should instead work to become a water-sufficient country and lead Asia in water conservation.

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