What The Definition of My Name “Talin” is: (Pronouncing it Taleen).

Hello everyone, I am here to write to you today about what my name Talin really means. A lot of people have been asking me this and today I decided to write to you all about it. My name comes from a city in Armenia and there is a church after my name as well. Talin is a town in the Aragatsotn province of Armenia with a population of 5,371 people.

People with this name are presumed to be balanced and receptive to co-operation. They are the ideal persons for partnership and always look for peace. It is important and imperative for them to learn how to speak up, or they may be taken advantage of. Which is so true. I tend to have the habit of being taken advantage of emotionally and mentally and Sometimes I can get stuck on too many details and have feelings of loneliness. It is so true. I have been doing a lot more research on my name and the meaning of my name lately. A lot of people want to know the origins of my name and the definition, the personality of my name.

(Talin is one of the oldest residential areas in the region, confirmed by evidence dated back to the 2nd millennium B.C. (among others bronze swords). During the 2nd century, Talin is mentioned by the Greek geographer Ptolemy, which he calls Talina. Excavations in the vicinity of the Talin Cathedral, near the hill, have revealed ancient building materials as well as receptacles.)
Credits and Origins from Wikipedia —- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talin

My name is pronounced “Taleen” – In high school and going to school, at work in the past, I have always been called “Talen” or my name would be spelled Taline with an E at the end, and there are so many ways to spell my name, like Talyn, Taleen, Talene, Talina, Telen, Talinee, and so many other ways to spell my name. I love my name so much. A lot of people I meet, they ask my name and I said I am Talin, and they said wow, that is a beautiful and unique name that I never heard of. Of course when you’re not Armenian. When I do meet Non-Armenians. I know I get a lot of different pronunciations when it comes to my name, and I really don’t like correcting people because I know it’s not nice, but I like my name pronounced “Taleen” and in Armenians they pronounce my name “Taaleen”.

Our names give us a sense of individuality, no matter if it is common, rare, unique. All names have a significant meaning and it gives us our identity in this world of existence. I’ve been doing extensive research on my name and among other peoples names. I love research and reading on interesting things.

Well, that is all about my name. What does your name mean? Do you have a common, rare or unique name? What does it mean to you? would love to hear your stories. All the best.

 

20 thoughts on “What The Definition of My Name “Talin” is: (Pronouncing it Taleen).

  1. You know? When I first read your name, I gave it the pronunciation it has in my native language, Spanish, and it pretty much sounds like the way it should be, ‘Taaleen’. In Spanish your name would be spelled Talín. Since you asked, my name is a combination of my mother’s name, Elba, and my maternal grandmother’s name, María. Dad came up with ‘Marielba’ (mah-ree-ehl-bah). Elba is also the name of an island, the one where Napoleon got banished, and María is a Hebrew name meaning ocean. So I guess my name is the loneliest name ever: sea of Elba, where Napoleon was ostracized. Who knows?

  2. I have a super common boring name however my kids do not.

    My Husband’s name is Stanislav Kalyuzhny (fairly common Russian/Ukrainian Name)

    Our Daughter is Jaciel Polina Kalyuzhnaya (Pronounced Ha-Sea-el) Jaciel has greek origins and means beautiful, however it is pronounced in spanish and is not at all a common name. Polina is Russian and Kalyuzhnaya is the feminine of Kalyuzhny.

    Our Son is Nikolay Nathaniel Kalyuzhny (Pronounced Nick-o-lie) Nikolay is a common Ukrainian name and spelling. He is named after Stas’ father. Nathaniel is french but I think we spelled it the american way. Kalyuzhny is the male form.

    Usual names for most here in this area. My husband is Ukrainian born and I am Irish and Mexican, second generation.

    Oh yeah my name, lol My name is Christina Leonor. LOL

  3. Margot is a form of Margaret, which comes from Sanskrit and means “pearl”. There is also a whole slew of saints with that name. I was named after my dad’s favorite cousin. FYI: I tend to use http://www.behindthename.com/ a great deal as a writer. I’m sure everyone knows about it, but I was kind of lost before I found it.

  4. I loved this post. I really relate to it as I have an unusual name. My Dad is from India and my Mum is from England but they agreed that as we live in England I should have an Indian name as a sign of my heritage (also because they felt an English name would look a bit silly with my Indian surname).. I often feel like it’s a bit of a pain as people can never pronounce it and people often confuse me as a boy as they are unsure about it. When I was little I was often jealous that my friends could get keyrings and other things with their names on but mine was never there! But after I read your blog it made me feel quite lucky to have an unusual name and I see it much more positively!

    Here’s to unique names! :)

    Kx

  5. My name, Aleta (A-lee-ta) is Spanish and Greek. I am named after my great, great aunt (her last name, Lane, is my middle name). It means ‘little winged one’ and ‘truthful’. I love it!

  6. I like your name. It sounds like it is a common name in Armenia. My name is Cathy which is normally short for Catherine but my mom did not like formal names. Girls who were born in the USA between 1955 and 1970 (I think) were often named Cathy or a variation thereof. Until recently when someone asked if my name was spelled using many different combinations I adamantly said it is CATHY but lately I say it doesn’t matter as it all spells the same thing. I just don’t worry about it anymore.

    Thank you for sharing your name’s meaning and your preferred pronunciation. I feel like I know a little more about who you are.

    Ta Ta for now, Cathy the Bagg Lady

  7. Talin, thanks for the pronunciation tip. Lovely name. My name is Amy Louise: Amy is “beloved,” while Louise is “warrior.” I can honestly say I was named well.

    About Armenia: I would be interested to read a post on your thoughts about the Armenian genocide of 1915, the blueprint for Hitler and other maniacs to come. I met a man from Armenia who questioned why I was wearing an Arabic scarf, and he launched into a tirade about how the Muslim majority of the WWI era did indeed commit genocide of horrific methods, wiping out almost a whole generation of the Armenian people. I let him rant. Then I told him that I bought the scarf from a perfectly nice old guy in NYC in the 80s, and that it was not a political statement, but a very comfy cotton scarf… I’m allergic to wool. The man, Armande, is homeless, and I have taken him to many coffee shops to discuss the conflict… he even brought his mother one day.

    Like bullying, it’s time to find a way to break free from the hold that certain symbols have on us (for me, it’s the swastika and the Confederate flag….) Love, Amy

  8. Hi, Talin. I think your name is beautiful, and I love the meanings behind it.

    My name, Nadine, is French, and means “hope”.

  9. We relate so much my name is talin swell and I always get it pronounced wrong unless it’s Armenian people and I wanted to know the real meaning of my name and this helped out alot

  10. My name is Talin Meghani. I am an Indian. I don’t know d exact pronunciation of my name but in India it means Lord Shiva. I am a devotee of Lord Shiva. I have realised this recently and I am quite happy that my name means my lord :-)

  11. I like this name because of its meaning, the Christianity entered Armenia first through Taleen , so Taleen is the first Christian town in Armenia…and that’s why I named my daughter Taleena

  12. I love hearing about the origins of names… My name Kente means “that which will not break or tear under any condition”. My last name, Bates, goes back before the time of Christ as a form of the name “Bartholomew”. It is also one of the first last names used as the surname was created to fund kingdoms in the High middle Ages timeframe (12th Century-14th Century). The name was first seen documented in the late 12th Century (c. 1172-73).

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